Project1917.com 13.03-21.01.1917

https://project1917.com/ 13.03.1917-21.01.1917

“1917. Free History” is a project that enables participants to find out about the history of 1917 from those who lived during this defining moment of twentieth century history.

The project consists entirely of primary sources. It includes not a trace of invention. All the texts used are taken from genuine documents written by historical figures: letters, memoirs, diaries and other documents of the period.

“1917. Free History” is a serial, but in the form of a social network. Every day, when you go onto the site, you will find out what happened exactly one hundred years ago: what various people were thinking about and what happened to each of them in this eventful year. You may not fast-forward into the future, but must follow events as they happen in real time.

“1917. Free History” is a way of bringing the past to life and bringing it closer to the present day. It is a way of understanding what the year 1917 was like for those who lived in Russia and in other countries. We have scoured archives and storerooms for texts, photographs and videos, many of which have never seen the light of day before.

The project is the work of a team of journalists, experts, designers, animators and illustrators.

How does it work?

Our main aim is to make history popular – to bring a multitude of voices from a diverse array of historically significant figures to as wide an audience as possible. That is why we do not always observe all those standards which are normally considered inviolable in serious scholarship.

We shorten texts to make them more readable. However, we never change the words or the sense of what has been written

Next to each entry, users will find a link directing them to the original document from which it was taken.

Project Team

Mikhail Zygar – project author, founder and editor-in-chief

Aleksandr Kerensky

Mikhaylovskoye artillery school, Petrograd, Russian Empire

Comrades! There arise moments in the existence of every nation – just as they do in the existence of individuals – when the most pressing question of the day is no longer how best to live, but whether life will continue at all. We are going through just such a moment, and must ask ourselves whether Russia will survive if the old order continues to exist. We are gathered here to swear that Russia will be free.

Like

Comment

2 Share

Anna Akhmatova

Sreznevskikh's ap., 9, Botkinskaya, Petrograd, Russian Empire

It’s going to be the same as the Great French Revolution, perhaps even worse.

Isabella Bottino

Like

1 Comment

9 Share

Vasily Shulgin

Shpalernaya, 47, the Tauride Palace, Petrograd, Russian Empire

The situation is such that we cannot do without many old bureaucrats. For who can replace them? And so they’ve decided to send members of the State Duma as ‘commissars’. One of the major and successful appointments was that of a Duma member and engineer Bublikov as commissar of ‘Communications’.

Like

Comment

Share

Alexander Bublikov

Railway ministry, Petrograd, Russian Empire

My first task was to dispatch a network-wide communiqué to the railwaymen regarding today’s events, and to call upon them to work toward the benefit of this newly free country. My second task was to ascertain the whereabouts of the Tsar.See more

Like

Comment

Share

Nicholas II

Likhoslavl, Tver region, Russian Empire

We left Mofilev at 5 o’clock in the morning. The weather was bright and frosty.

Like

1 Comment

Share

Sophie Buxhoeveden

The Empress had said to me that to go "would look like flight," and she was also afraid of the risk to the children had they been moved while they were so ill. On the morning, however, she told me that I should "quietly pack my bag to be able to start with them at any moment, should this prove necessary." The gentlemen had on that morning again raised the question of the Empress's departure, but it was too late now.

Like

Comment

Share

Zinaida Gippius

Sergievskaya 83, Petrograd, Russian Empire

There will be further battles. Lord! Save Russia. Save her, save her, save her. Save her from herself, guide her as You see fit. See more

Like

Comment

Share

Maurice Paleologue

10, Kutuzov embankment, Petrograd, Russian Empire

The firing, which had died down by this morning, began again about ten o'clock; it seemed to be pretty vigorous in the region of the Admiralty. Armoured cars, with machine-guns and displaying red flags, were continually passing the embassy at top speed. More fires were blazing at several points in the capital.See more

Like

Comment

Share

Vladimir Lenin

Zurich, Switzerland

From Russia we receive nothing, not even letters! We relay through Scandinavia.

Berlano Andrade, Isabella Bottino

Like

Comment

Share

Alexandra Kollontai

Oslo, Norway

No sooner do I take a seat in the carriage than I see the following large-lettered headline on the front page of my neighbour’s newspaper: REVOLUTION IN RUSSIA. My heart quivers. For some reason, I believe it at once: this is no journalistic bluff, this is for real. I try to make out what it says. It’s too late to buy a paper of my own – the train has set off. “When you’re done with it, lend it to me,” I say to my neighbour. “I’m Russian – it’s only natural that I should be in interested in what’s going on.”

Smiljana Antonijević, Jess Zilla and 1 other

Like

Comment

Share

Nikolai Wrangel

Petrograd, Russian Empire

I see a handsome officer decorated with the order of St George. He is surrounded on all sides, surrounded tightly, as if in grips of a vise. He turned pale, but remains calm. No a single face muscle twiched; he looks right at the bastards’ faces with cold, calm eyes and I feel that he will look at death the same way.See more

Like

Comment

Share

Nikolay Punin

Fountain house, 53, Liteynyy avenue, Petrograd, Russian Empire

The troops are disorganised, they’re all thronging about while officerless military patrols attempt to maintain order. Could it really be that socialism’s creative energies will be put into effect? My people, will you find in it yourselves to become great at last?

Like

Comment

Share

Grand Duke Michael Alexandrovich

Petrograd, Russian Empire

8 o’clock, we were woken up by heavy traffic, of both passenger and freight cars, that were overcrowded with soldiers who were shooting, mostly, into the air—there were also strong explosions of hand grenades. See more

Like

Comment

Share

Jean Cocteau

Rome, Italy

We are once again in Rome after our travels in Naples, where we also explored Pompey in an automobile. I think that no city in the world will ever please me such as did Naples. See more

Like

Comment

1 Share

Sergei Bulgakov

Zubovsky boulevard 15, ap. 11, Moscow, Russian Empire

Military units and automobiles had already materialised, together with sinister-looking, revolver-wielding, long-haired types – and girls of a corresponding appearance. The Kremlin was taken almost without a single shot being fired, and, come evening, Moscow found itself in the hands of the revolutionary authorities.See more

Like

Comment

Share

Maxim Gorky Ekaterina Peshkova

Petrograd, Russian Empire

Soldiers fraternize with the public and the mood, in general, is improving. It is difficult to understand how all this will end. Take care of our son.

Jess Zilla

Like

Comment

1 Share

Rurik Ivnev

Lahtinskaya street, Petrograd, Russian Empire

The soldiers have joined the people. Armed soldiers roam the streets in automobiles draped in red flags. The crowd greets them with a “hurrah” and people throw their caps in their air. A worker explains to an assembled crowd that he works from morning to night and still his family are dying of hunger. See more

Like

Comment

Share

Leon Trotsky

Redaction of the "New World" magazine, Manhattan, 77, New York

Disorganised, compromised, fragmented government at the top, a completely crippled army, discontent, uncertainty and fear among the propertied class, a deep exasperation in the lower classes, an exponentially grown proletariat, hardened in the fire of current events—all this gives us the right to say that we are witnessing the beginning of the Second Russian Revolution. Let’s hope that many among us take part in it.

Orlando Da Rocha Hill

Like

Comment

2 Share

George Buchanan

4, Dvortsovaya embankment, Petrograd, Russian Empire (British Embassy)

The old Government had ceased to exist, and all its members, with the exception of Pokrowski and of the Minister of Marine, Admiral Grigorowich, had been arrested. By the evening the whole garrison, as well as all the troops which had arrived from Tsarskoe and the neighbouring districts, had gone over to the Duma, while many officers had also offered their services. So far as Petrograd was concerned, the rev ...

Быстрая навигация назад: Ctrl+←, вперед Ctrl+→