Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them

J. K. Rowling

Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them

The Original Screenplay

Illustrations & design by MinaLima

The digital heart of the Wizarding World

www.pottermore.com

To the memory of Gordon Murray, real-life creature healer and hero

Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them: The Original Screenplay

Acknowledgments

Glossary of Film Terms

Cast and Crew

About the Author

About the Book Design

Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them

SCENE 1

EXT. SOMEWHERE IN EUROPE—1926—NIGHT

[Downloaded from eBookBB.com] A large, isolated, derelict chateau emerges from the darkness. We focus on a cobbled square outside the building, shrouded in mist, eerie, silent.

Five Aurors stand, wands aloft, tentative as they edge toward the chateau. A sudden explosion of pure white light sends them flying.

We whip around to find their bodies scattered, lying motionless at the entrance to a large parkland. A figure (Grindelwald) enters the frame, his back to the camera; ignoring the bodies, he stares out into the night sky as we pan up toward the moon.

MONTAGE:

We see various magical newspaper headlines from 1926 relating to Grindelwald’s attacks all over the world: GRINDELWALD STRIKES AGAIN IN EUROPE, HOGWARTS SCHOOL INCREASES SECURITY, ANTI-WIZARD FEELING ON THE RISE, WHERE IS GRINDELWALD?, IS ANYONE SAFE? He’s a serious threat to the magical community and he’s vanished. Moving photos detail destroyed buildings, fires, screaming victims. The articles come thick and fast—the worldwide hunt for Grindelwald continues. We push in on a final article displaying the Statue of Liberty.

TRANSITION TO:

SCENE 2

EXT. SHIP GLIDING INTO NEW YORK—NEXT MORNING

A bright, clear New York day. Seagulls swoop overhead.

A large passenger ship glides past the Statue of Liberty. Passengers lean over the rails, looking excitedly toward the oncoming land.

We push in toward a figure sitting on a bench with his back to us—Newt Scamander, weather-beaten, wiry, wearing an old blue overcoat. Beside him rests a battered brown leather case. A catch on the case flicks open of its own accord. Newt swiftly bends down to close it.

Placing the case on his lap, Newt leans in, whispering:

NEWT

Dougal—you settle down now, please. It won’t be long.

SCENE 3

EXT. NEW YORK—DAY

AERIAL SHOT of New York.

SCENE 4

EXT. SHIP/INT. CUSTOMS—SHORTLY AFTERWARD—DAY

Among bustling crowds, Newt walks down the gangplank of the ship as we push in toward his case.

CUSTOMS OFFICIAL (O.S.)

Next.

Newt stands at customs—a long row of desks by the shipyard, manned by serious-looking American officials. A customs official examines Newt’s very tattered British passport.

CUSTOMS OFFICIAL

British, huh?

NEWT

Yes.

CUSTOMS OFFICIAL

First trip to New York?

NEWT

Yes.

CUSTOMS OFFICIAL

(gesturing to Newt’s case)

Anything edible in there?

NEWT

(placing a hand over his breast pocket)

No.

CUSTOMS OFFICIAL

Livestock?

The catch on Newt’s case flicks open again. Newt looks down and hastily closes it.

NEWT

Must get that fixed—ahh, no.

CUSTOMS OFFICIAL

(suspicious)

Let me take a look.

Newt places the case on the desk between them and discreetly flicks a brass dial to MUGGLEWORTHY.

The customs official spins the case toward him and pops the catches, lifting the lid to reveal:

Pajamas, various maps, a journal, an alarm clock, a magnifying glass, and a Hufflepuff scarf. Finally satisfied, he closes the case.

CUSTOMS OFFICIAL

Welcome to New York.

NEWT

Thank you.

Newt gathers his passport and case.

CUSTOMS OFFICIAL

Next!

Newt exits through customs.

SCENE 5

EXT. STREET NEAR CITY HALL SUBWAY—DUSK

A long street of identical brownstone houses, one of which has been reduced to rubble. A gaggle of reporters and photographers mills around in the vague hope of something happening, but without much enthusiasm. One reporter is interviewing an excitable middle-aged man as they move through the rubble.

WITNESS

—and it was like a—like a wind or like a—like a ghost—but dark—and I saw its eyes—shinin’ white eyes—

REPORTER

(expressionless—notebook in his hand)

—a dark wind—with eyes . . .

WITNESS

—like a dark mass, and it dove down there, down underground—I swear to God . . . into the earth right in front of me.

CLOSE ON PERCIVAL GRAVES as he walks toward the destroyed building.

Graves: Smart clothing, very handsome, early middle-age, his demeanor differs from those around him. He is watchful, tightly coiled, an air of intense confidence.

PHOTOGRAPHER

(sotto voce)

Hey—did you get anything?

REPORTER

(sotto voce)

Dark wind, blah blah.

PHOTOGRAPHER

It’s some atmospheric hooey. Or electrical.

Graves moves up the steps of the now ruined building. He examines the destruction, curious, alert.

REPORTER

Hey—you thirsty?

PHOTOGRAPHER

Nah, I’m on the wagon. Promised Martha I’d lay off.

Wind begins to pick up, swirling around the building, accompanied by a high-pitched screeching. Graves alone looks interested.

A sudden series of bangs at street level. All turn to look for the source of the sound: A wall cracks, the rubble on the floor begins to shake before exploding like an earthquake, ripping out of the building and down through the middle of the street. The movement is violent, rushed—people and cars go flying.

The mysterious force then flies up into the air, swirling through the city, diving in and out of alleyways, before crashing down into a subway station.

CLOSE ON GRAVES as he examines the destruction of the street.

A mingled roar and howl emanates from the bowels of the earth.

SCENE 6

EXT. NEW YORK STREET—DAY

Watching Newt walk, we see in him an unselfconscious Keatonesque quality, a sense of a different rhythm to those around him. In his hand he clutches directions on a small piece of paper, but still shows a scientist’s curiosity about this alien environment.

SCENE 7

EXT. ...

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